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Monthly Archives: January 2010

rucksack house

project: rucksack house

designer: stefan Eberstadt

total area: 9 sqm

The Rucksack house is a walk-in sculpture with its own spatial quality, which is also an attempt to explore the boundary between architecture and art. This can be transformed into a house extension, as a cheaper and faster alternative to usual extensions.

rucksack house

While still being inside a private atmosphere filled with light, one has the impression of floating outside of the confines of the actual dwelling above the public space. Folddown furnishings and a multitude of built-in openings on the inside provide extra living space with direct daylight. Sections of the walls unfold, with the help of hidden magnets, into a desk, shelves, and a platform for reading or sleeping.

rucksack house

rucksack house

rucksack house

rucksack house

 The Rucksack box is suspended from steel cables that are anchored to the roof or to the facade of the existing building. The construction is a welded steel cage with a light birch veneered plywood interior cladding. The outside cladding is exterior grade plywood with an absorbent resin surface punctuated by plexiglas inserts.  Lifted up in place with the help of a crane, the house can be dismantled and relocated.

rucksack house

The project had been assembled in three German locations: Leipzig, Köln and Essen.

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The Guggenheim Museum will feature an exhibit called Contemplating the Void: Interventions in the Guggenheim Museum from 12th Feb thru 28th April of this year, 2010. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Guggenheim building, a visionary structure designed by Frank Lloyd Wright.

Guggenheim Museum, New York

Guggenheim Museum, New York

Since its opening in 1959, the Frank Lloyd Wright designed Guggenheim building has served as an inspiration for invention, challenging artists and architects to react to its eccentric, organic design. The central void of the rotunda has elicited many unique responses over the years, which have been manifested in both site specific solo shows and memorable exhibition designs.

Guggenheim Museum, New York

The museum invited over 200 designers, artists, and architects to reimagine their dream interventions in the Guggenheim Museum’s central rotunda. The guidelines for the project invited artists to “leave practicality or even reality behind in conjuring their proposals for the space.” The exhibition will feature renderings of these visionary projects.

Anish Kapoor

State Fair by MAD architects, beijing

Flow Show by WORKac, new york

Perfection Perversion by West 8, netherland

Lets Jump by MVRDV

 

[Art Trap], designed by the architecture firm, Mass Studies .

Mass Studies

Mass Studies

Mass Studies

 

[Experiencing the Void] by JDS/Juein de Smedt

Juien de Smedt

mass studies

architect: cho,minsuk + park,kisu
design team: mass studies
location: 650-14, Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul, korea
site area: 377.60 m2
gross floor area: 220.66 m2
total floor area: 734.33 m2
building scope: 3f,b1
finishing: vertical garden(Pachysandra terminalis),
exposed color concrete
design period: 2007.1~2007.5
construction period: 2007.4~2007.10

Ann Demeulemeester, seoul

Ann Demeulemeester, seoul

text about the shop from the architects

Ann Demeulemeester Shop

The site is located in an alley, at a block’s distance from Dosandae-ro—a busy thoroughfare in Seoul’s Gangnam district—in close proximity to Dosan Park. Primarily residential in the past, the neighborhood is undergoing a rapid transformation into an upscale commercial district full of shops and restaurants.

The building is comprised of one subterranean level and three floors above. The Ann Demeulemeester Shop is located on the first floor, with a restaurant above and a Multi-Shop in the basement.

This proposal is an attempt to incorporate as much nature as possible into the building within the constraints of a low-elevation, high-density urban environment of limited space (378m2). The building defines its relationship between natural/artificial and interior/exterior as an amalgamation, rather than a confrontation.

Ann Demeulemeester, seoul

Diverse interior spaces designated for its three main programs were made to be perceived and utilized as a part of the outdoors in a variety of ways. This building is not meant to be just another ‘object’ to be experienced externally, but rather as a synthetic organism of nature and artifice.

The parking lot/courtyard is at the center of the site, exposed to the street on the southern end. The entrance to the Ann Demeulemeester Shop is located on the western side of the courtyard, and stairs that lead to the other two programs are located on the eastern side. Landscaping of dense bamboo form a wall along each of the remaining three sides that border neighboring sites. Inside the first floor shop, undulating dark brown exposed concrete forms an organically shaped ceiling.

Ann Demeulemeester, seoul

Ann Demeulemeester, seoul

Round columns on the edges of the space continue the ceiling surface while providing the necessary structural support. This structural system creates arched openings of varying sizes that are open and as exposed as possible to the outside road and the bamboo hedges. This organic formation is not only a dynamic space but a flexible rectangular one (11.2m x 14m). The additional wing on the eastern side contains support functions such as fitting rooms, storage, and a bathroom, efficiently divided and connected at the same time.

Ann Demeulemeester, seoul

The restaurant’s main entrance is a staircase that runs alongside the entire eastern side of the building. The shape of the ceiling below influences the restaurant space above, comprised of a three-level skip-floor formation. The two open-air spaces inside, a hidden terrace toward the rear of the building that extends from the top level, and a rooftop space accessible by stairs form a restaurant with intimacy, varying in spatial characteristics.

The stairs leading to the basement shop begins as a narrow, white, architectural space that gradually enlarges to become another organic shape—like a moss-covered subterranean cave—and serves as an entrance. This space is open to the outside, while at the same time is a composite garden buried 5.5m below ground.

Ann Demeulemeester, seoul

Ann Demeulemeester, seoul

The outside building material is primarily a geotextile planted with a herbaceous perennial to form a living façade, while the other three sides that face bamboo borders are clad in steel sheets are finished with propylene resin.

Ann Demeulemeester, seoul

Ann Demeulemeester, seoul

Ann Demeulemeester, seoul