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Tsujita restaurant by Takeshi Sano

 
 
 
 
Project: Tsujita Restaurant
Location: LA California
Designer: Takeshi Sano 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Tsujita restaurant by Takeshi Sano

Tsujita restaurant by Takeshi Sano

Tsujita restaurant by Takeshi Sano

Tsujita restaurant by Takeshi Sano

 

material used:

25000 wooden sticks

Tsujita restaurant by Takeshi Sano

Carbon Bar by Khosla Associates

Project: Carbon Bar

Design Firm: Khosla Associates

Location: Hyderabad, India

Carbon bar by Khosla Associates

Carbon bar by Khosla Associates

Carbon bar by Khosla Associates

material used:

flooring: seamless bronze vinyl

ceiling & walls: faceted padded fabric & bronze mirrors

lighting: pre-programmed dimmable led light embedded with translucent resin strips moulded on the edge of all the facets.

Carbon Bar, Plan

Carbon Bar, Interior Sections

 

Mundvoll Café + Grocery Store by Joint Perspectives

 

Project: Mundvoll Café + Grocery Store

Design Firm: Joint Perspectives
Location: Friedrichshafen, Germany
Use: Café/Grocery Store
Total Area: 79sqm

Mundvoll Café + Grocery Store by Joint Perspectives

 

Mundvoll Café + Grocery Store by Joint Perspectives

 

Mundvoll Café + Grocery Store by Joint Perspectives

 

 

Mundvoll Café + Grocery Store by Joint Perspectives

Mundvoll Café + Grocery Store by Joint Perspectives

 

Mundvoll Café + Grocery Store by Joint Perspectives

 

 

Material used: Plywood, wooden crates, metal & paint

Furniture: Joint Perspectives ( designed + custom made)

          Bar: layered plywood, color stained wood, colored metallic basket

          Shelves: plywood structure cladded along the colored magnetic metal strip (for price tags)

          Menu: magnetic black board

 

 

 

 

Elektra Bakery, Greece

Project: Elektra Bakery

Design Firm: Studioprototype Architects

Location: Edessa, Greece

size: 35 squre metres

Elektra Bakery, Greece

Elektra Bakery, Greece

 

 

 

 

 

Elektra Bakery, Greece

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

materials used: carrara marble, cedear wood, brass

furniture: Xavier Pauchard

lightings: Tom Dixon

exterior: vertical cedar board cladding, black powder coated steel

Elektra Bakery, Greece

 

Elektra Bakery, plan

Elektra Bakery, elevation

Tokujin Yoshioka, Kartell-Snowflake, Milan 2010

Tokujin Yoshioka, Kartell-Snowflake, Milan 2010

an installation with hundreds of transparent plastic sticks at the Kartell showroom in Milan designed by Tokujin Yoshioka to showcase their newly designed chair ” invisible”

Transparent plastic sticks are painted with white to create snowflake effect of the space

Tokujin Yoshioka, Kartell-Snowflake, Milan 2010

Tokujin Yoshioka, Kartell-Snowflake, Milan 2010

Tokujin Yoshioka, Kartell-Snowflake, Milan 2010

Tokujin Yoshioka, Kartell-Snowflake, Milan 2010

Tokujin Yoshioka, Kartell-Snowflake, Milan 2010

mass studies

architect: cho,minsuk + park,kisu
design team: mass studies
location: 650-14, Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul, korea
site area: 377.60 m2
gross floor area: 220.66 m2
total floor area: 734.33 m2
building scope: 3f,b1
finishing: vertical garden(Pachysandra terminalis),
exposed color concrete
design period: 2007.1~2007.5
construction period: 2007.4~2007.10

Ann Demeulemeester, seoul

Ann Demeulemeester, seoul

text about the shop from the architects

Ann Demeulemeester Shop

The site is located in an alley, at a block’s distance from Dosandae-ro—a busy thoroughfare in Seoul’s Gangnam district—in close proximity to Dosan Park. Primarily residential in the past, the neighborhood is undergoing a rapid transformation into an upscale commercial district full of shops and restaurants.

The building is comprised of one subterranean level and three floors above. The Ann Demeulemeester Shop is located on the first floor, with a restaurant above and a Multi-Shop in the basement.

This proposal is an attempt to incorporate as much nature as possible into the building within the constraints of a low-elevation, high-density urban environment of limited space (378m2). The building defines its relationship between natural/artificial and interior/exterior as an amalgamation, rather than a confrontation.

Ann Demeulemeester, seoul

Diverse interior spaces designated for its three main programs were made to be perceived and utilized as a part of the outdoors in a variety of ways. This building is not meant to be just another ‘object’ to be experienced externally, but rather as a synthetic organism of nature and artifice.

The parking lot/courtyard is at the center of the site, exposed to the street on the southern end. The entrance to the Ann Demeulemeester Shop is located on the western side of the courtyard, and stairs that lead to the other two programs are located on the eastern side. Landscaping of dense bamboo form a wall along each of the remaining three sides that border neighboring sites. Inside the first floor shop, undulating dark brown exposed concrete forms an organically shaped ceiling.

Ann Demeulemeester, seoul

Ann Demeulemeester, seoul

Round columns on the edges of the space continue the ceiling surface while providing the necessary structural support. This structural system creates arched openings of varying sizes that are open and as exposed as possible to the outside road and the bamboo hedges. This organic formation is not only a dynamic space but a flexible rectangular one (11.2m x 14m). The additional wing on the eastern side contains support functions such as fitting rooms, storage, and a bathroom, efficiently divided and connected at the same time.

Ann Demeulemeester, seoul

The restaurant’s main entrance is a staircase that runs alongside the entire eastern side of the building. The shape of the ceiling below influences the restaurant space above, comprised of a three-level skip-floor formation. The two open-air spaces inside, a hidden terrace toward the rear of the building that extends from the top level, and a rooftop space accessible by stairs form a restaurant with intimacy, varying in spatial characteristics.

The stairs leading to the basement shop begins as a narrow, white, architectural space that gradually enlarges to become another organic shape—like a moss-covered subterranean cave—and serves as an entrance. This space is open to the outside, while at the same time is a composite garden buried 5.5m below ground.

Ann Demeulemeester, seoul

Ann Demeulemeester, seoul

The outside building material is primarily a geotextile planted with a herbaceous perennial to form a living façade, while the other three sides that face bamboo borders are clad in steel sheets are finished with propylene resin.

Ann Demeulemeester, seoul

Ann Demeulemeester, seoul

Ann Demeulemeester, seoul